[/et_pb_column]

AUDIO BURSTWeb Radio Today   

Burst 9.2  06.12.20

The Cross and the Rooster

 

AUDIO BURST 9.2 June 12 2020

by Skip Orem | Web Radio Today

TRANSCRIPT

9.2  BURST 06.12.20 TRANSCRIP

(00:03):

Like many of you, the cross is such an important symbol of my faith. The crucifix depicting Jesus nailed to the cross, or just the plain cross without Jesus on it. I find it comforting to have that symbol, to focus on it and think about what Jesus did for us, what he gave to us by his horrible death on the cross on Good Friday. And then his resurrection on Sunday morning. He gave us new life. And to me, well, that’s what the cross symbolizes, not only his suffering, but our new life in Jesus. Thinking about the cross, looking at it, it helps me to keep his death and his resurrection always in the front of my mind, the suffering that Jesus endured, the suffering he endured so that we might be saved, that if we believed in him believed he was the son of God followed his teachings, that we’d have eternal life. Jesus, he bought and paid for all of that for us, suffering on the cross, and then his wonderful resurrection.

(01:23):

I was in Germany several years ago, I was on a cruise. I don’t remember if it was the Rhine or Mozel river. It doesn’t matter. As we went up that river, looking at all the scenery, I was looking at the churches along the way, and it struck me that some had crosses at the top of their steeples while others had a rooster. A friend on the cruise with me told me that, that there was sort of a pattern in Europe of crosses being on Catholic churches and then the rooster on churches of the Protestant faiths. He didn’t understand why the differences, but it caused me to start thinking, what about this rooster thing? I was thinking that other than the Rooster’s involvement with Peter’s denial of Jesus, I didn’t really get the symbolism of the rooster.

(02:21):

It interested me. So I did a little research and I found that in Christianity, the rooster is actually a symbol of Jesus, just like the lamb. And then in a lot of literature, the rooster, he has this darkness and light symbolism attached to him. Like Jesus, the rooster announces the light that follows the night. Think about this. The birth of Jesus meant the appearance of new light into the world. The rooster on the weather vane always faces into the wind. So it’s sort of a symbol of Jesus facing into the sins and dangers of the world. I was thinking that of all this symbolism of a rooster, I kind of liked the symbolism of a rooster announcing the new dawn.

(04:03):

Like the rooster announcing the new dawn, Jesus’s death and resurrection announces, well, it announces the new dawn of our new life with him, in him. And everybody, whether it’s the promise of the cross or the new dawn being announced by the rooster, my invitation to you. You haven’t done so already, won’t you come to the light, enjoy the new dawn? Leave the darkness and come into the light.

(05:12):

Be refreshed. Cover yourself with the light. This is your golden opportunity to have the past wiped away, your sins forgiven. I’m not going to lie to you, your days and your nights, they might not be easier. Troubles, they’re still going to be there. Those troubles of the world, they don’t get wiped away, but now what’s happening is you’re walking in the light, a new dawn, and listen to this. Jesus is with you. He’ll show you the way, he’ll comfort you in times of trouble. Forgive you when you get off track. He’ll challenge you to be a better person. A Christian, a follower of Jesus walking in the light. The rooster is crowing. The new dawn is here waiting for you. Why don’t you walk out of the darkness and to the light and accept Jesus Christ as your Lord and your savior. There’s no more time. Do it today. Experience the light, feel the release, accept the gift.

[/et_pb_column][/et_pb_section]
[/et_pb_column]
[/et_pb_column]